Sad or Sober News Can be the Most Difficult Kind to Report On

Sometimes it is so difficult to write a post about Alvord phenotypes . . .  Especially when the most recent news does not seem to be particularly encouraging, uplifting, edifying . . .

Yet much as ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder;’ so it is that whether positive précises are derived, whether lasting lessons can be learned, whether constructive courses of action can be formed, whether we see the cup as not being empty — depends so on our resiliency and resolution as native trout enthusiasts — and our inclination to hope for, and to do, all that we can in behalf of a remnant of a strain of trout that may now simply number in the dozens—a few dozen—in a hatchery environment ran by employees of the State of Oregon. Continue reading

Posted in ***** Creek Sampling, Observations, Of Fauna and Flora, Photo Journals | 5 Comments

Absolutely, Among the Rarest of Species on the Whole Planet

Of trout species native to the Great Basin and Range, many are uniquely adapted to the alkaline environments and the harsh extremes of this desolate, austere, expanse.  In such lethal environs, species that adapt, even by losing the natural predisposition for cold, clear neutral pH waters and advantageous climes, may survive — even come to be dominant — in this remote and unforgiving region of North America.

It would require far more space than this brief post can afford do justice to the processes whereby a species is buffeted and pared down to a survivor species that comes to be fairly “comfortable” in such exacting intolerant surroundings.

Yet of many unique species that call our western deserts home, there is one that stands out as perhaps one of the absolute rarest species in existence on the whole planet. Continue reading

Posted in Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Observations, Of Fauna and Flora, Photo Journals | 1 Comment

Kudos to Shannon Hurn — Best Wishes on Her new Journey

We heard from Shannon Hurn today that the Guano Creek fish at the hatchery have finally started growing — and have shot up to an average of 100 mm.  We also were informed that Shannon will be leaving the Fisheries Biologist position in SE Oregon – to take a watershed management position on the north coast, starting next month. Continue reading

Posted in ***** Creek Sampling, Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Observations, Of Fauna and Flora, Photo Journals, Progress - Reply - Response - Status | 3 Comments

The State of the Art of De-Extinction

Generally a subject that I’ve not commented on . . .  nor given much thought about it as a credible consideration where the extinct Alvord cutthroat trout are concerned . . .

Yet times and technology are continually changing.  New thought processes are under foot; processes being pursued as potential solutions for the dilemma of the extinctions currently transpiring for so many species across the globe. Continue reading

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of Fisheries Biologists and a Remarkable Genetic History of Cutthroat Trout

Years ago we came across an article in the Lacrosse Tribune regarding a local Fisheries Biologist who was utilizing what were then deemed to be somewhat unorthodox methods for restoring native trout — yet his work yielded superlative results, and perhaps set a model for future biologists to come who are confronted with potential demise of a native strain of trout. Continue reading

Posted in ***** Creek Sampling, Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Narratives, Observations, Of Fauna and Flora, Progress - Reply - Response - Status, The Word is Out | Leave a comment

A Slight Digression, Sept. 2012 Native Fish Society Report

Without a real update status report, and without a visit to the region of SE Oregon where this remnant of phenotypical Alvord cutthroat trout have persisted through the last years, it is difficult to have a tremendous amount of information to report on and to write about…

Yet, in reviewing literature on the region and the subject at hand, I realized that there is a report from September 2012 published by the Native Fish Society with relevant history or perspective regarding Trout Creek’s neighbors to the east: Willow and Whitehorse Creeks.

Embedded below is a brief excerpt from the Conservation and Science Report, September 2012, by Bill Baake: Continue reading

Posted in Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Narratives, Of Fauna and Flora | 2 Comments

Extreme Bitter Cold — to Unprecedented Devastating Drought

I have to say, I really don’t like the way this winter has been shaping-up.  Especially in terms of what it means, and what it will mean, for these fledgling trout in SE Oregon . . .

As Michael Snyder of American Dream wrote last week: “The worst drought in the history of California is happening right now.”

” . . . 2013 was the driest year ever recorded in the state of California . . . the driest January that the state of California has ever experienced . . . The worst drought in the history of California is happening right now.” Continue reading

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The Treachery of Winter in the Barren Desert

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Sometimes it is so challenging to write; to carry on with a dialogue regarding this strain of trout that is not supposed to exist.

The last time that we were on the system, temps were well below freezing—in the teens at night, and still below freezing (in the shade) during the day.

But, an extreme cold front hit the Pacific Northwest after that last visit, and for a week or so the lows on the west (Pacific) side of the Cascades were -10⁰ F at night, and roughly -30⁰ F at night for a week (or more) on the creek.

It truly is incomprehensible how these trout can survive in such extremes.

Continue reading

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Ice Fishing — For Extinct Alvord Cutthroat Trout

The extreme battle for survival that the native cutthroat trout of the west have had to endure in order to perpetuate their species from generation to generation; from pluvial times of millennia ago, to searing parched drought conditions of today’s western desert, have been recounted in previous posts; with what was deemed to be a reasonably complete picture of the strife and the struggle that these trout endure on a perpetual basis. Continue reading

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